Brad Alles

Brad Alles is an Assistant Professor of Education at Concordia University Wisconsin. He graduated from Concordia University Nebraska with a Bachelor’s degree in education, and received his Master’s degree in Christian education from Concordia University Chicago.

Posts by Brad Alles

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God’s design

I remember reading a Newsweek article years ago that was called, “Science finds God.”  The article stated that the order found in nature was a strong argument for God’s existence.  One quote stood out to me: “It turns out that if the constants of nature–unchanging numbers like the strength of gravity, the charge of an electron [&hellip

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The Big Bang and the 9/11 Attacks

According to the Big Bang Theory, there was an explosion billions of years ago that gave way to the universe working in clockwork precision. A question to ask regarding this big bang would be, “What about the Second Law of Thermodynamics?” Part of this law (not a theory!) states that things in our universe go [&hellip

1046179_another_explosion_in_space[1]

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The Big Bang’s Assumption

Remembering that all worldviews begin with assumptions and have to explain what is real so we can understand the world, let’s turn our attention to the issue of evolution and the origin of all things from a purely naturalistic viewpoint, without God, design, or purpose. The Big Bang Theory states that billions of years ago, [&hellip

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Testing worldviews (Part 3)

A third test for a worldview is whether it is useful or relevant in life. A Secular Humanist may state that there are no gods, no life after death, no ultimate foundation for ethics, no ultimate meaning in life, and no free will. Since these implications stem from evolution—that the universe came about all by [&hellip

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Testing worldviews (Part 2)

A second test for a worldview is that it doesn’t have contradictions. If something is logically inconsistent, it cannot be true. Refer to the dictionary definition of truth: “conformity to knowledge, fact, actuality, or logic.” For example, you can’t be a married bachelor. Or take Secular Humanism’s stance on ethics, or how to behave, which [&hellip

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Testing worldviews (Part 1)

People can believe whatever they want, but that doesn’t make it true. I can believe that I can fly, but when I fall off the roof instead of zooming through the sky, the truth (and the ground) smacks me in the face. So it is with worldviews. You can believe what you want—but is it [&hellip

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Worldview basics (Part 3)

Let’s conclude the explanation of worldview components.  All worldviews have to answer fundamental questions. These are questions that all people ponder—issues that are universal to all humans. The questions that all want answered are: Where did we come from? Why are we here? What can we do about evil and suffering? And what happens when [&hellip

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Worldview basics (Part 2)

What is right and wrong?  How do we decide?  Is there anything wrong with anything?  As we continue to examine worldview components, we come upon their ethical stance.  All worldviews have beliefs about how to live. Recall that according to atheism, no God exists. Furthermore, Secular Humanism believes that there is no supernatural realm, just [&hellip

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Worldview basics (Part 1)

A worldview is the truth claims that explain the world and reality. It helps people make sense of the world, like a map, so they can navigate through life. The worldview will tell them what is real, how to live, and answer basic questions. For example, Christianity teaches that God exists, that faith in Jesus [&hellip

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How to defend the faith (Part 2)

When I wrote earlier about defending the Christian faith, I mentioned that what we say (content) is important, but so is how we say it (delivery). Here is a good tactic: ask questions.  For instance, when issues come up, ask, “What do you mean by that?”  Or, “How do you know that to be true?”  [&hellip

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