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“Hallucination” theory (Part 1)

A third theory to address Christ’s resurrection is the hallucination theory. It proposes that the disciples thought they saw Jesus alive; in other words, that it was all just an illusion or a figment of their imagination. There are a number of problems with this theory. Normally, hallucinations are rare, and caused by drugs or [&hellip

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“Theft” resurrection theory (Part 2)

Exploring the theft theory to explain the Resurrection yields other interesting developments. For instance, this theory states that the disciples stole the body while the Roman guards slept. This doesn’t make sense because to actually fall asleep while on watch meant the death penalty for Roman soldiers. That’s why the chief priests and elders devised [&hellip

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“Theft” resurrection theory (Part 1)

Another theory to explain away the resurrection of Jesus is the theft theory. In this scenario, Jesus’ disciples stole His body, hid the corpse, and proclaimed to everyone that He was miraculously alive. This theory is actually as old as the resurrection itself; it is recorded in the Bible in Matthew 28:11-15: “While the women [&hellip

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“Swoon” resurrection theory (Part 2)

Some don’t believe that Jesus rose from the dead because He didn’t die on the cross in the first place. Does the swoon theory, that Jesus didn’t die but passed out on the cross, explain the Resurrection? The biggest objection to the swoon theory is the fact that Jesus had been pierced in the heart [&hellip

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“Swoon” resurrection theory (Part 1)

Some people contend that Jesus did not rise from the dead. Skeptics continue to develop explanations on what really happened, even though they lived mant years after Christ. Karl Venturini, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, suggested the “swoon theory.” The swoon theory says that Jesus swooned, or fainted, on the cross, but did not [&hellip

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Jesus’ resurrection was known

In the evidence outside of the Bible for the historical Jesus of Nazareth, there were references to His divinity—that He was considered to be God by His followers. Why would people think Jesus was God? From the previous chapter we saw that Jesus taught large crowds, had many followers, healed various diseases, cast out demons, [&hellip

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Did Jesus really exist? (Part 5)

We continue with some final evidences of Jesus’ existence.  The persecution of early Christians continued in the Roman empire. In Asia Minor (or modern day Turkey), Pliny the Younger was writing to Emperor Trajan in the second century seeking advice. Since so many Christians had been killed, whether young or old, male or female, Pliny [&hellip

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Did Jesus really exist? (Part 4)

The historical record of Jesus life outside the Bible continues.  The Greek satirist of the second century Lucian labeled Christians “misguided creatures” for worshipping the crucified Christ as the Son of God and for living a godly lifestyle. “The Christians, you know, worship a man to this day—the distinguished personage who introduced their novel rites [&hellip

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Did Jesus really exist? (Part 3)

Jesus’ death, as well as His life, is recorded by ancient historians.  And an interesting occurrence during his death is covered in these documents. When Jesus was being crucified, the Bible records a darkness covered the land from noon until 3:00 PM. Luke 23:44-45 says, “It was now about the sixth hour, and darkness came over the whole land until [&hellip

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Did Jesus really exist? (Part 2)

Here’s more evidence for the reality of Jesus’ existence.  Although not a Christian, Josephus, a first century Jewish historian, recorded the following: “At this time there was a wise man called Jesus, and his conduct was good, and he was known to be virtuous. Many people among the Jews and the other nations became his [&hellip

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